About the Domaine

Domaine Mayoussier is a relatively new winery located in the Royans area, bordering the north of the Vercors mountain range in France. The area is interestingly situated between two great wine regions: the Northern Rhone area (Cornas, Tain-l’Hermitage, Saint-Joseph…) and the Savoie region (Combe de Savoie, Gresivaudan valley, the Chartreuse…).

The Domaine is a family business, run by Antoine Depierre who is taking care of both the vineyard and the cellar, on its family old property, a farm and castle whose first stones date from the 13th century. Antoine Depierre started the Domaine in 2012 after a first career working as sommelier and restaurant manager in London, Berlin, Miami and Dubai(!).

Ideally placed between North-Rhone and Savoie…

The Domaine produces today seven wines, four of which are actually produced in partnership with a grower located further south in the Drome department. The three others are from fruits from the Domaine. The Domaine is indeed still farming a rather limited surface of almost three hectares, which would not be enough for the project to be economically viable. Even if small, it offers a variety of soil of clayey-limestone, alluvials and galets-roulés.

The philosophy of Antoine Depierre is very much to respect nature, hence to not use machines but horses to work the soils, to follow organic practices, naturally banning pesticides and working by hand. The philosophy is also one of freedom and transparency, but not of standards or labels, hence not looking after any sort of certification and not caring too much for the long list of requirements from the appellations and other institutions

We decided to focus our attention on the wines which came from the domain for now. They feel more complex and personal, maybe because of the terroir. The other wines are still very good, no doubt about it, maybe simply less representative of the personality of the Domaine.

Antoine Depierre, winemaker and co-owner.

The wines

Le culotté de Mayoussier (2019)

  • A dry white wine from a blend of Sauvignon Blanc and Roussanne. Harvested by hand.
  • Unfined and unfiltered.
  • Vinified and aged on lees in stainless steel tanks during 6 months.
  • Vines 6 to 8 years old.
  • Soil: galets, alluvial and then clay (Roussanne), small galets roulés and alluvial (Sauvignon Blanc)
  • Production: 1200 bottles.

The wine is elegant and surprisingly alive and crisp. One could expect these grapes to give a bigger and bulkier wine, but that’s not the case. It shows a nice backbone of acidity and freshness recalling citrus notes and more exotic fruits. Still able to stand against serious food. We pair this with great pleasure with scallops or even with a local plate of ravioles.

Viognier (2019)

Viognier
  • Dry white wine
  • 100% Viognier
  • Unfined and unfiltered
  • Aged six months in neutral used oak barriques
  • Soil: limestone scree (Viognier)
  • Production: 800 bottles.

Probably because it is in slightly higher altitude and not as hot as the Rhone valley, the wine feels fresher than many Viognier, more aerial than many of its expressions in North Rhone. This is a fantastic wine for eating, we enjoyed it a lot on some charcuterie, and feel like it would stand nicely against a terrine or even a foie gras but works beautifully with old hard cheeses like a Mimollete, an old Gouda or Cheddar or even with some hard aged St Marcellin, to speak of another specialty from the region.

Syrah (2019)

  • Dry red wine
  • 100% Syrah
  • 2 weeks maceration, daily punch-down
  • Aged six months in neutral used oak barriques
  • Soil: galets roulés and alluvial (Viognier)
  • Production: 1200 bottles.

A fantastic wine for dinner in summer as much as winter, very versatile, but pairing beautifully with red meat and local food from the Dauphiné. It feels like right on the connection with the Mondeuse, which is a cousin of the Syrah. Carrying somehow similar spices and smoky notes without being ever heavy and big. Maybe, here again, the “pre-alpine” geographic position of the Domaine, between Rhone and the Alps? Or maybe it is just imagination, but it’s anyway a delicious feeling!